To create an emotional experience, storytelling goes beyond the aesthetic design of the physical spaces, positioning of the collections and the way the space conveys a story.


Telling your story in different and engaging ways is the key to to reach out to a wide range of audience with different expectations, needs, abilities, lifestyle, thought process and learning styles. Digital interpretation is an equally important part of the whole experience.


Here are the top ways you can tell a story through Gamar tours and trails.


1. Augmented Reality animations


Tell your story through augmented reality animations which would show up when guests point their device camera to the exhibit - a painting, photo, picture or a 3D object. The key benefit of this activity is that it motivates your guests to seek the object first and then gives them more information about it.


"This activity leaves your guests with happy memories about the exhibits and collections as it makes them work for it and when they find it they are then rewarded with an AR animation in the form of a lovely surprise."


A great idea for this is 'Talking Sculptures' - have the sculptures talk to the guests and tell their story, like Mr. William Hobson from the Redoubt Fortress, Eastbourne.


'Redoubt Fortress trail' at the Redoubt Fortress, Eastbourne


Another great idea for this is the 'Animals of Early Egypt' game at the British Museum for the Early Egypt gallery, Room - 64. The design team at the British Museum worked closely with Egyptian curators, educational team, interpretation and research team in building this game. In this game, they chose to tell the story of Early Egypt through animals. It is the time before Pharaohs and animals had great significance in the people's lives then.


The story of each animal is explained in the form of an augmented reality animation. For example, in this one guests have to look for Ostrich egg shells and when they point their device to the broken egg shells, an animation appears detailing about how Ostriches influenced Early egyptians and how the eggs were used in their daily lives.


'Animals of Early Egypt' at the British Museum


2. Image and Text


Tell your story with an image and text - the classic way. There are two visual formats for this depending on the images you have or the way you would like it to be. You can add as much text as needed. The guests can simply scroll down the text if they wish to read more.


'Florence Nightingale' trail at the Florence Nightingale Museum, London


'In the Night Garden™' trail at the four RHS Gardens, May-June 2017


3. Video and Text


Tell your story with a video and text. In the 'Kingmaker DigiTrail', the story is told in small video bytes accompanied with a bit of text. It is the year of 1471 when England was in the midst of civil war and the army is off to prepare for the final battle.


In the video screen below, you can see one of the army members inviting the player to join in. All the video bytes were specially made for the trail. This trail was created to experience the Kingmaker's wax figurines exhibition at the Warwick Castle.


'Kingmaker DigiTrail' at the Warwick Castle



Here is another format where you can add a lot of fun facts about the artefact and any related subject.


'Animals of Early Egypt' at the British Museum



4. Video


Tell your story with a video. Here is an example from 'Jolly's Tapestry Trail' at the Doddington Hall, a video of a conservation team member explaining how a tapestry is made.


Interview of the Tapestry Conservation team from 'Jolly Tapestry Trail' at the Doddington Hall


Below is another example of a perfect use of video - a 'BSL Guided Tour' by Heritage Ability for the visitors at the Killerton House in Exeter. The trail allows anyone to see a guided BSL tour of the Killerton House on their mobile device.


Guests can access a map of the Killerton House in the BSL guided tour and select BSL videos from each room


5. Audio


Tell your story with Audio, one of the most powerful media. Below are two examples of perfect use of Audio - in a walking tour at the city of Ripon and the tour of Belvoir Castle.


'Ripon Plaques Walking Tour' a trail that reveals the history of Ripon through its green plaques


Belvoir 'Castle Audio Tour' where the Duchess shares some amusing stories about the beautiful Paintings Gallery 


6. Audio and Text


Here is a way if you would like some text to accompany the audio. Inclusion is another reason why you might want to have some text there.


'The Legend of Nelson' at the National Maritime Museum



7. Quizzes


Tell your stories through a simple quiz - choices can images or simply just text. Every choice - right or wrong is an opportunity to tell a story.


'Kid's Misery Trail' at Ripon Museums


8. Games


"Play is our brain's favorite way of learning."

Diane Ackerman


Games are the best way to tell stories. In this example, guests at Cutty Sark have to deal with the Captain Woodget's mischievous monkey to retrieve the stolen cake. The curatorial and visitor engagement team chose to tell the story of the world famous Cutty Sark through little games on board the ship. The monkey is the Captain's much loved pet who always used to steal food on the ship leaving the crew with fun memories.


'Captain Woodget's Apprentice' at the Cutty Sark


All in all, a fine balance of different elements will help make your story most impactful. Here is a brilliant example of immersive storytelling by the Royal Opera House, London. Mayerling is a mystery story trail around the Royal Opera House that beautifully combines Audio, Video, Quizzes and Augmented Reality activities. This is a walking tour and the trail becomes active only when you are in the location.


'Mayerling' is a immersive mystery story trail around the Royal Opera House



Gamar is constantly evolving and supporting different engaging ways of storytelling. Do you believe in any other ways for digital interpretation? We'd love to hear your thoughts.




Blog header Image by Prawny on Pixabay



Tags: Augmented reality, Museums, Gamar games, Digital Interpretation, Storytelling, Stories, Castles, Parks, Historic Houses, Audio tours, Videos, Quizzes

Rachel Lydford

Avid painter, cyclist and video game player. Culture, arts and museum enthusiast. Customer Success Manager at Gamar.


We’d love to hear your thoughts!

Please let us know what you’d like to see more of.